20 Best Responses to “Peace Out”

If you have heard a person use the phrase, ‘Peace out’, you should have an idea of what it means. You may be wondering how to respond to ‘Peace out’. This article will give you a hand.

‘Peace out’ is slang that refers to the sign of beating one’s chest with hi/her fist twice to suggest departure. ‘Peace out’ means you have to go somewhere or leave a place.

One of the best responses to ‘Peace out’ is ‘See you later’ which is also a popular phrase that signifies departure.

Below are 20 other answers when someone says “Peace out”

  1. Goodbye
  2. See you around.
  3. Are you leaving already?
  4. Hold on.
  5. When will you be back?
  6. Hit the road.
  7. Let me know when you get home.
  8. Have a good day.
  9. Be back early.
  10. Don’t get hit by a bus.
  11. Till we meet again.
  12. I have to go too.
  13. I’ll give you a call.
  14. Safe journey!
  15. You’re still needed here.
  16. Where are you heading to?
  17. Extend my regards.
  18. Good to see you go.
  19. See you on the other side.
  20. No peace for the haters.

Goodbye

‘Goodbye’ is one of the simplest and most common responses to ‘Peace out’. It’s a straightforward word that says farewell to another person.

‘Goodbye’ not only comfortably responds to ‘Peace out’ but can stand alone as a departure greeting. It can also comfortably replace the phrase, ‘Peace out’. In other words, instead of saying ‘Peace out’, you can say ‘Goodbye’. The response to this can also be ‘Goodbye’.

‘Goodbye’ is versatile enough to respond to itself. ‘Goodbye’ can be said by the person who’s leaving. ‘Goodbye’ can also be said by the person that is being left.

If you are wondering how to respond to ‘Peace out’, now you know how easy it is and how familiar you already are with it.

See you around

How to Respond to Peace Out

‘See you around’ is a good response to ‘Peace out’ commonly used when two people are parting.

This is a departure statement that can replace ‘Goodbye’ and ‘Peace out’ on a few occasions. However, this statement is less as diverse as ‘Goodbye’ is. If you are wondering how to respond to ‘Peace out’, this is one of them.

The speaker may be saying ‘Peace out’ to simply leave the conversation but may be hanging around and not necessarily leaving the vicinity. This is the best time to say ‘See you around’.

‘See you around’ means that you are leaving a person but not going far and may see each other around a few times.

You can also say this to a friend who lives nearby. It means ‘we will definitely meet/see each other again very soon’.

 Are you leaving already?

‘Are you leaving already?’ is a nice question in response to ‘Peace out’ if the speaker appears to be leaving abruptly or too early.

This question is not meant to be a departure greeting but it’s often used to pass the message that you don’t expect the person to leave or you don’t want him/her to leave yet.

This question only makes sense to be asked by the person that’s being left.

You can say this first to suggest that the person stays back for a while. If he/she really has to go, then you can say ‘Goodbye’ or any other farewell statement after this.

Ask this question if the person is not expected to leave yet or the conversation is not over yet. Now you know how to respond to ‘Peace out’.

Hold on

‘Hold on’ is a simple response to ‘Peace out’ to call the attention of the speaker to something

This statement is not a departure greeting and doesn’t directly answer to ‘Peace out’. However, you can say this to tell the speaker not to leave yet. ‘Hold on’ implies ‘Stay for a while’, ‘Wait for me’, or ‘Quick attention’.

You can use this to tell the speaker to stay for a while, possibly to wait for something to happen or for something to be over. You can say this to tell the speaker to wait for you, that is you want to leave with him/her.

You can say this to get the speaker’s attention for a moment and ask a question to tell him/her something.

When will you be back?

‘When will you be back?’ is a cool question to ask in response to ‘Peace out’ inquiring about what time to expect the speaker’s return.

This question comfortably responds to ‘Peace out’ in many situations but can be awkward in some cases. You can ask this question if you are missing the speaker already.

You can ask this question if the speaker is a friend, a partner, or a neighbor. You can ask this question if you think the speaker is needed in that place. You can also ask the question if the speaker is not expected to go far or even leave that place.

However, this question would be pretty awkward if he/she is just an acquaintance. It would be awkward to respond with this if the speaker is traveling and you are not supposed to be concerned with him/her.

If you were wondering how to respond to ‘Peace out’, ‘When will you be back?’ is a good question and one of the best responses to ‘Peace out’ if you are conversing with someone you are close to.

Alright. Hit the road.

‘Alright. Hit the road’ is a casual response to ‘Peace out’, communicating in the same informal language and expressing your understanding of the speaker’s need to depart.

‘Hit the road’ is an informal phrase that implies leaving a place or traveling over a long distance. This response suggests that you are okay with the speaker’s decision to leave. You understand why he/she has to leave and you are encouraging him/her to go ahead.

When the speaker says ‘Peace out’ and you believe he/she needs to be elsewhere, you can tell him/her to hit the road.

If you didn’t know how to respond to ‘Peace out’, now you do.

Let me know when you get home.

‘Let me know when you get home’ is a nice response to ‘Peace out’ which shows care for the speaker’s welfare.

This response implies that you would want the speaker to inform you when he/she gets home safely. You can say this if you both are away from home or if the speaker is in your place.

This means you both are not leaving that place together and you want the speaker to tell you that he/she got home safely.

This is how to respond to ‘Peace out’ if you are speaking to a younger person or a lover. It may feel awkward if he/she is just a friend.

Have a good day

How to Respond to Peace Out

‘Have a good day’ is another common response to ‘Peace out’ which is often used during departure.

This response is similar to ‘See you around’ but slightly different. It can also be used in place of ‘goodbye’ in some occasions but is less as versatile. ‘Have a good day’ can be said if you are the one leaving. You can also say this if you are being left.

‘Have a good day’ can comfortably replace ‘Peace out’ if you don’t expect to see the other person for the rest of that day.

Be back early

‘Be back early’ is a good response to ‘Peace out’ which directly states your desire to have the speaker back early.

This response tells the speaker to return to wherever you are in time. You can say this if you live in the same home or vicinity in which that person is living. This response makes more sense if you both have a bond.

Therefore, you should only consider this response if it doesn’t sound awkward to the speaker.

You can’t say this to an acquaintance unless there is a need for him/her to be there with you. You also can’t say this to someone who is not expected to return.

Don’t get hit by a bus.

‘Don’t get hit by a bus’ is a funny and friendly response to ‘Peace out’, stating your good wish for the speaker.

This response tells the speaker to stay safe on the road in a casual and funny manner. You can say this to wish a close friend safety.

This response makes more sense if the speaker is traveling a long distance or is not expected to return early.

You can also say this to someone that is coming to you i.e. you can say this over the phone if the speaker informs you of his/her approach.

Till we meet again

‘Till we meet again’ is a nice response to ‘Peace out’ and an English translation of the popular Spanish phrase ‘Hasta Luego’

This response implies ‘you are saying goodbye to the speaker till you meet him/her again’. You should only say this if you don’t know how soon or when exactly you will meet the speaker again.

You can’t say this to a friend or family. You also shouldn’t say this to someone who will definitely be back soon.

This statement is also used as a stand-alone farewell greeting but is always used by acquaintances who don’t plan to meet again.

I have to go too.

‘I have to go too’ is a cool response to ‘Peace out’ announcing your desire to also leave the place like the speaker is doing.

This response tells the speaker or another person that you will be leaving that place. You can say this to call the speaker to wait for you. You can also just use this to announce your need to leave.

Alright. I’ll give you a call.

‘Alright. I’ll give you a call’ is a friendly response to ‘Peace out’ stating how you will communicate with the speaker later.

This response implies that you will reach out to the speaker without giving a specific time. You are acknowledging the speaker’s need to leave the place and telling him/her to expect your call.

Safe journey!

‘Safe journey!’ is a cool response to ‘Peace out’ wishing the speaker safety on the road.

This response implies that the speaker is traveling somewhere far and you are wishing him/her a safe journey. It may also mean that he/she will spend a long time on the road.

You can say this as a casual joke to a friend who won’t be going far or for a long time.

You’re still needed here

‘You’re still needed here’ can be a good response to ‘Peace out’ if the speaker is leaving abruptly.

This response implies that the speaker is not expected to leave since he/she is still needed in that conversation or place.

Letting the speaker know why he/she should be there can convince him/her to stay.

Where are you heading to?

‘Where are you heading to?’ is a good question in response to ‘Peace out’ to know where the speaker is going.

This response asks the speaker to tell you where he/she is going. It may also question why he/she is leaving at that moment.

You can ask this question if he/she is leaving abruptly. You can also ask if you just really want to know where the speaker is going.

This question is also justified if you are thinking of leaving that place for a moment but don’t know where to go.

Extend my regards

‘Extend my regards’ is a nice response to ‘Peace out’ which is often used during departure.

This response implies that you want the speaker to greet friends or family on your behalf. You can say whom he/she should extend your regards to.

This response makes sense if you know the speaker and the friend or family member whom you want the speaker to greet on your behalf  

Good to see you go

‘Good to see you go’ is a funny response to ‘Peace out’ which can also denote a grudge between you and the speaker.

This response implies that you are happy to see the speaker leave. This can be used as a clear joke if the speaker is a friend and there is no grudge between the two of you. It would be found funny.

This can also be used if you perceive the speaker as being rude for leaving abruptly. This response would mean that you don’t mind the speaker leaving in the middle of the conversation and you are happy about it.

See you on the other side

‘See you on the other side’ is another funny response to ‘Peace out’.

This response can be interpreted in several ways but will be initially interpreted to mean ‘death’. This will be funny, however. No one wants to die.

No peace for the haters

‘No peace for the haters’ is a funny and casual response to ‘Peace out’ if the speaker is a close friend.

While this response may sound like you are against the speaker, it will sound cringe-worthy to say this to someone you are quarreling with.

You can say this if you are talking to a close friend. It will be perceived as a clear joke.

Wrap Up

‘Peace out’ is a statement that signifies the speaker’s departure. It can simply mean goodbye and the speaker may also use it to leave a conversation abruptly.

The best responses depend on the tone of the statement and how close you are to the speaker. They range from a simple and friendly ‘goodbye’ to a nice comeback like ‘Get hit by a bus’.

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